/ by: RoseHoffaQuilts

DIY – Quilter’s Ironing Board

Have you ever wanted more space to iron on?  A nice sturdy space that doesn’t wobble and that you can really press those blocks without the ironing board flexing everywhere?  Well after going to a Quilt to You Wilt and the big quilting ironing board was talked about by the ladies and apparently all the rage.  I decided it’s time to DIY and make an ironing board.  I did look at buying one they mentioned, but this DIY ended up being only about $25 and that was way cheaper than buying one.  Translation – more money to spend on fabric.  Yeah!  Maybe a little more if you need to invest in the stapler and spray adhesive.  Plus hey – I have the space to make my own.

This is a super easy project and if you Google quilter’s ironing boards, quilting ironing board or big board you’ll find about a zillion instructions and video.  I used this lady’s video as my go to, but I read through a ton of entries.  I had seen the Big Board – the ones the ladies raved over, which you can put right on top of your current ironing board, but since I had this spare table that was just being used for storage in my room, I decided it was time to put it to use.  I would love to use an old farm table, but haven’t found one yet.  You can also use this method for a tray table.

Now if I can do this – anyone can.  I’m probably the least handy person.

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board Here’s what you need –

  • Heavy Duty Staple Gun
  • 3/4″ heavy duty staples
  • Adhesive Spray
  • Water Spray bottle
  • A good pair of scissors
  • A board or surface – I used a birch board that I got at Home Depot 1/4 inch thick 2 ft x 4 ft. Less than $10.
  • Duck Cloth – Use a coupon – around $5 and I used a yard.
  • Warm and Natural – Use a coupon – around $8 – I bought a yard and have some left over.
  • Felt – Again coupon – about $2 and I bought a yard and have a lot left over.
  • Hammer – just to pound down the staples if necessary.

So first thing I had to do was flatten the board and give it a new memory.  It was just a little bendy – so keep this in mind when picking out a board.

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board
 I used a old wet towel that I then applied heat to by way of the iron.  This warmed the board up and then I applied clamps and heavy things to make it flat.

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board

The next night I laid out some paper to protect my table.  I then made the sandwich.  Now the board will have a smooth side and a not sanded side.  Put your Warm and Natural on the not sanded side.  I cut it – about 3″ over on the sides I then peeled it back and put a little spray adhesive.  Then I layered the Duck Cloth.  Once I had the duck cloth on then I flipped it over and re-centered it.  Then I started to pull as tight as I could and put the staples in.  I pulled and stapled, pulled and stapled tucking the corners in.  I put some muscle = the little I have – into this part.  Next time I recover this I will trim some off the corners so that it folds a bit better.

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board


 Finally after that portion is done it’s time for the felt.  I cut the felt to size and then did the same thing as the Warm and Natural applying a little more spray adhesive.  Finally I flipped it over.DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board

 

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board

Now can you see the wrinkles and how it’s not quite as tight as you or I would like.  Well get your spray bottle.  Next spray a good layer of water on it and watch the magic happen.  Right before your eyes it will shrink up.  I then used the iron to speed things along a bit and voilà- nice and smooth.

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board

DIY Quilter's Ironing Big Board

Now I can iron a whole fat quarter at a time and have space to lay them out while cutting.


_DSC5186
 My helper wasn’t impressed.

 

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Welcome Violet!

RoseHoffaQuilts

I’m a professional quilter and maker of pretty things.

  • You make it look easy! I have an old board that I’ve been using for years, that has a strange warp. It’s time to make a new one. I thought it would be much harder, but I think I can do this. Thanks, for the guidance.

  • […] least a year and the wonkiness of the bear claw block was the last straw. I used a combination of Madame Purl’s method and the tutorial from Sew We Quilt. My board is 1/2-inch poplar plywood and it’s covered with […]

  • COMMENTS (5)

    1. Stoneview | 13 June - 2012

      […] least a year and the wonkiness of the bear claw block was the last straw. I used a combination of Madame Purl’s method and the tutorial from Sew We Quilt. My board is 1/2-inch poplar plywood and it’s covered with […]

    2. Kitty 05 March - 2012

      You make it look easy! I have an old board that I’ve been using for years, that has a strange warp. It’s time to make a new one. I thought it would be much harder, but I think I can do this. Thanks, for the guidance.

    3. Jeanna 13 December - 2011

      Thanks so much for the tutorial, I have been wanting to make one, now I think I can!!

    4. yvonne 21 October - 2011

      Nice, thanks for sharing this wonderful tutorial. I decided to create something like this. Btw, your cat is sooo cute 🙂

    5. Julie 29 September - 2011

      Very nice! Not enough room in my space for one though. I think you’re helper is just SO neglected and starving for attention. 😉